How does the GDELT Global Dashboard work and what can peacebuilding practitioners get out of using GDELT’s event data? Check out TC109: Tech for Conflict Management & Peacebuilding course facilitator Charles Martin-Shields in his recent post in “Insight on Conflict”.



Peacebuilders face a variety of risks at multiple different levels when using ICTs in any political environment. What are a few things conflict managers can focus on while planning a project?



The release of the South Sudan Ushahidi map has spurred an online dialogue on the possibilities and challenges of how we understand crowdsourcing, big data, and technology for conflict management and peacebuilding. Read on to see how we make use of emerging data and technology tools in pursuit of peace and stability.



Spreading violence in South Sudan threatens thousands of civilian lives, political stability in the region, and even outbreaks of transmissible disease. How should the international community begin to address this hot conflict, and prepare for what is likely to be a global humanitarian response effort. Who are the key actors? What are their motivations? What are our windows of opportunity to see a reduction in violence?



In recent years, mobile phones have drawn tremendous interest from the conflict management community. What can the global peacebuilding community learn from Kenya’s application of mobile technology to promote peace in other conflict areas around the world? What are the social and political factors that explain why mobile phones can have a positive effect on conflict prevention efforts in general?





There has been a recent surge in literature that is cynical of ICT4D projects. Spurred on by the randomized control trial results of ICT4D projects, such as those of the One Laptop Per Child initiative in Peru, more and more authors are concluding that ICT4D projects’ capacity to end poverty and promote transformative national or community development is often stifled by political hang-ups. Even annual ICT4D Fail Faires have occurred the past three years, where practitioners willingly explain how their project failed and what they learned.



You’ve heard of the 90/10 rule, right? I hadn’t heard the concept, at least, until recently. The meaning, though, I learned the hard way—an ICT-enabled project should be 90 percent planning and only 10 percent digital tool. Not the other way around.

We initiated the Nigeria Security Tracker, an effort to catalog and map political violence based on a weekly survey of domestic and international press, at least two years ago. We wanted to answer the question “are things getting worse in Nigeria?”



On May 7 I was invited to give a talk as part of a brown bag lunch panel hosted by the UNDP’s Bureau for Conflict Prevention and Response (BCPR).  This panel also included input from senior staff from BCPR and the E-governance team in the UNDP’s governance policy shop.  We expected 20-30 participants from within the UNDP; what we got were about 50-60 participants from across the UN system.   …