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  • Will

    Hi All, feel free to ask questions in this space. We’ll do our best to work them into the conversation.

  • craig lefebvre

    Might be useful to look at WEIRD culture and it’s impact on research and practice.

    • Christine

      this was definitely one aspect of what I’m thinking, Craig! glad we’re on the same page.

  • Christine

    Will you be touching at any point on the influence of *organizational* culture in design, implementation, and analysis? the on-the-ground relationship between an organization and the people it serves is powerfully influenced by this.

  • Christine

    most cross-cultural research has taken place in industrialized and highly-educated places, reaping the benefits of long research duration, a literate study population, a hiring pool for research assistants that is not only literate but has social-science training…. can you offer any insight on rapid qualitative analysis in remote/rural areas that lack these affordances?

  • Joanne from MAMA

    Good morning/afternoon/evening everyone! Please leave any questions in the comments and Nick will weave them into the discussion.

  • Will

    @craiglefebvre:disqus, @Christine, thanks for the input! We’ll do our best to address these questions.

  • Tara

    How do you speak about the unspeakable? Michael brought this up in his gum example, and I think it speaks to many of the challenges around maternal health messaging because in some cultures pregnancy is not openly discussed or shared. How would you all at a Point Forward recommend conducting ethnographic research and/or creating health messages for cultures in which pregnancy is something to be kept secret?

    • Christine

      I think there’s a parallel challenge in talking about things that Everyone Knows About, as well. in many cases, knowledge of the cause(s) of a disease plus knowledge of and access to resources to prevent it is *still not enough* to produce motivation.

      how do you crack the next-step meaning and utility of resources for an intervention population when there are widely accepted tropes for what that meaning and utility already are?

      • Tara

        Interesting point and questions Christine. By “cracking next-step meaning and utility of resources” do you mean bringing about behavior change and overcoming pervasive and deeply rooted beliefs around maternal, newborn and child heath?

        • Christine

          Thanks for the conversation, Tara! I mean that, if there are widely-accepted *positive* meanings and utility ascribed to resources for health (for maternal health, for malaria, for child abuse, anything), and yet people are not *using* these resources, there are deeper layers of meaning at work.

          for example, in the States, we all know about the benefits of condom use; there are widespread resources for obtaining condoms; and yet, even in areas where people generally accept condoms, value their utility, and have access to aquire them – people don’t. in South Sudan, where I did guinea-worm eradication work, everyone knew you got sick from unfiltered water, everyone knew how to get a free filter (from volunteers and field officers), everyone knew how to use a filter pretty well. and yet…. not everyone filters water, and people still get sick.

          there are deeper layers of meaning that are pretty easy to guess at – the sensation of sex with a condom isn’t as enjoyable as sex without; filters make good bags for tobacco, and very few people are getting sick. the layer of meaning that would be useful for intervention design and implementation would be to understand why people think that these are acceptable risks, and whether there is a degree of utility that would encourage people to choose the intervention rather than risk (a thin enough condom, a filter that works on a jerican but not as a bag).

          (as someone obsessed with human emotion, my personal conviction is that, in both these cases, *emotional* motivation can overcome a high tolerance for risk. we can build emotional investment in a community, either to the intervention or the organization conducting it, to increase participation… but hopefully that’s not the only key.)

  • Joanne from MAMA

    Can the Point Forward team explain how long it took to do the Wrigleys research? How long should a team plan to take for this research and how many people do you think they will need to speak to before the important stories emerge?

  • Nishant Kishore

    Thank you so much to MAMA, Point Forward and Tech Change for this very interesting and useful open course! Absolutely fascinating examples on cultural adaptation of product marketing. Do you have frameworks or examples you can suggest for going through with the cultural analysis? Secondly one of the issues we will face as we scale with our project (ChatSalud in Nicaragua) is difference in reading levels in urban vs. rural settings. While we have noticed a difference in messaging in local ads we also see within our focus groups that with health messaging, individuals expect a higher level of vocabulary and professional language use. Do you have any insights or experience in adapting messaging for different reading levels? Do you think it might be better to maintain the “professionalism” expected in health messaging? Thank you! – Nishant

    • Tara

      Wonderful questions Nishant. I think Aponjon in Bangladesh offers valuable insights to both. They found, for example, that the voice of an auntie figure was more popular in rural settings, while in urban settings a young female doctor voice was preferred.

  • Sascha

    It sounds like the speakers are describing focus groups, but yet I thought they found challenges with that forum. In what forum were these discussions of swear words etc. discussed?

  • Christine

    many thanks to MAMA and Point Forward for opening up this webinar and discussion to free agents like me. cheers!